Recommended Are All Employees Knowledge Workers? John Hagel III, John Seely Brown, and Lang Davison @ Harvard Business Review

Richard Florida, The Creative Class
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Found at http://blogs.hbr.org/bigshift/2010/04/are-all-employees-knowledge-wo.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+harvardbusiness+%28HBR.org%29

We live in a world of haves and have nots. No, not the kind you might imagine. These people reside within our companies. We increasingly group the people in our firms into two classes: those who have knowledge and talent and, by implication, those who do not. This segmentation is misleading and damaging to firms in the long run.

Ask executives to identify the talent within their firm and many will focus on the top tiers of management. Often, they will include in this august group the “high potentials” being groomed for leadership roles. Sometimes, they will extend the boundaries to include “creative talent” or “knowledge workers“. But then there is the rest of the workforce.

When talking about talent, many executives focus on what Richard Florida calls the “creative class”: engineers, scientists, architects, educators, researchers, coders, artists and, more broadly, knowledge workers.

To be continued at http://blogs.hbr.org/bigshift/2010/04/are-all-employees-knowledge-wo.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+harvardbusiness+%28HBR.org%29

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