The rise and ohoh rise of the collaborative organization

The core

This is a nuts-and-bolts guide.

Jacob Morgan provides the information, insights and a strategic framework you need to use emergent   collaborative software behind your company‘s firewall to solve business problems, unearth new opportunies   and to drive innovation.

This book is about enterprise 2.0. As defined as the use of emergent social software platforms by business in  pursuit of their goals regardless of whether it is inside or outside the firewall.

Jacob Morgan is the principal and co-founder of Chess Media Group, a management consulting and strategic advisory firm on collaboration. He is the author of his new book “The Collaborative Organization,” the first strategic guide for executives and decision makers seeking to deploy emerging technologies and strategies in the workplace (published by McGraw Hill, due out June 2012).

My rating

4,5 stars on a scale 0-5.

In an earlier post I wrote about the inertia of some managers for investing in knowledge management.

 In that post I made a reference to Kaplan and Norton’s Strategy Maps: Converting Intangible assets into tangible outcomes.

Jacob includes one – at least for me – essential part of it:

None of these intangible assets has value that can be measured seperately or independently.
The value of these intangible assets derives from their ability to help the organization implement its strategy…..

Intangible assets such as knowledge and technology seldom have a direct impact on financial outcome such as increased revenues, lowered costs and higher profits, Improvements in tangible assets affect financial outcomes through chains of cause-and-effect relationships.

Jacob and I agree completely with that statement.

The author claims that one can use the book as a guide for a one’s collaborative journey. One should utilize everything you can in this chapter and in the book, adapt it, change it and make it your own. Regular readers may see a similar approach as of my blog serve4impact: context, connect, construct and compact changes. But be cautious: the book has a technology focus. To really start your collaborative journey I would like to recommend Morton Hansen book on Collaboration and Andrew McAfee’s Enterprise 2.0.

 I refer buying this book to anyone who is working in a knowledge intensive industry. As a   manager or profesional. It is not limited to leaders for creating , implementing and adapting a strategy. Buy the book and do not read all of it. Check out your action points and start reading. As stated before, there is even more food of thougth (such as this fine reading list).

One flaw of the approach is that the approach of collaboration is limited at the enterprise level. Be aware of that.

But to mitigate that flaw, I will include some fine decks. Not for reading, but for creating action.

 

 

 

Decks and further reading

Senior executives are skeptical of the value of social software.

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Trust Me, I’m a Designer: 9 Principles for Creative Credibility by Jason CranfordTeague

A recent study by Demos (Demos.co.uk) called Truth, Lies and the Internet found that a third of teens polled in the UK believe any information they find on line is true without qualification. Even more staggering is that a 15% of that group admit to making their decision about the truthfulness of the content of a Web page based on appearance alone.

Photocredit:  SeñorJenks

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5 Reasons Why Metaphors Can Improve the User Experience

See on Scoop.itDesigning design thinking driven operations

There are many ways to experience the world around us. Especially offline, we can make use of our different senses to collect information, interpret our environment and make judgments.

On the Web, however, our senses are more limited. As designers, we need to present information carefully to make sure our users think, feel and do the right thing.

A great way to help your users understand abstract content, create a sense of familiarity, trigger emotions, draw attention and motivate action are metaphors.

See on sixrevisions.com

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Andrew McAfee’s Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business

Miss Annie: Pastels.And.Dots

Andrew McAfee of the MIT Center for Digital Business explains how new collaborative tools let everyone create and organize information

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MIT Andrew McAfee’s The Decline of the HPPO (Highest Paid Person’s Opinion)

500px / Untitled photo by Yurii Yatel

Found at The Decline of the HPPO (Highest Paid Person’s Opinion).

Many established companies still practice “decision making by HPPO” (Highest Paid Person’s Opinion), according to Andrew McAfee of the MIT Center for Digital Business. But McAfee says that the next wave of Enterprise 2.0, a term he coined, will see companies managing decision making and knowledge in decidedly new ways.

Read all at The Decline of the HPPO (Highest Paid Person’s Opinion).

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