The Clothesline Paradox and the Sharing Economy by Tim O’Reilly

From the author: My keynote at OSCON 2012 in Portland, July 18, 2012. Focuses on the contribution of open source software to the economy, using the metaphor of “the clothesline paradox” first articulated by Steve Baer in CoEvolution Quarterly in 1975

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How Long Before You Will Scoop.it Instead of Google It?

See on Scoop.itDesigning design thinking driven operations

“Services like Scoop.it depend on a community of millions of hardworking experts who wonder what to do with the wealth of knowledge and wisdom they have accumulated in life and are happy to share it.”

Written by blogger Shred Pillai on the Huffington Post, this vibrant praise of Social Curation in general and Scoop.it in particular, points out the changes we’re seeing in the way we look for information. From basic search, we now look more and more for meaning and context from human experts.

Beyond information, we want knowledge.

And this is what Curation is all about.

As he concludes: “At the end of the day, Scoop.it, which is free, is the right answer for information seekers and providers as well as the experts who like to show off their expertise.”

See on www.huffingtonpost.com

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Dear [insert Business Name], What’s Your Promise?

Geschwisterliebe

Not only functional but also emotional. And not only business but also as a professional or as a person.

See on Scoop.itDesigning design thinking driven operations

“You say you want to get closer to customers, but your actions are different than your words.

You say you want to “surprise and delight” customers, but your product development teams are too busy building against a roadmap without consideration of the 5th P of marketing…people.”

If we are to truly change, we must find purpose. We must uncover the essence of our business and the value it delivers to traditional and connected consumers. We must rethink the spirit of today’s embrace and clearly articulate how transformation is going to improve customer and employee experiences and relationships now and over time.

What’s Your Promise? Your promise to me as your consumer, stakeholder, and partner.

 

An Inspirational Post by Brian Solishttp://bit.ly/w1AGy8 , Read Entire Article Here:  http://bit.ly/LxjGnM

See on www.briansolis.com

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KMWorld Trend-Setting Products of 2011 – KMWorld Magazine

onetrackmindcycling:</p>
<p>kinsssthetics:</p>
<p>prank me</p>
<p>next up on the otm submission list… hint hint<br />
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<p>Via <a href=Scoop.it – Designing designed customer service

KMWorld Trend-Setting Products of 2011KMWorld MagazineConsona: Consona KM 8.0- a true knowledge management solution with enhanced usability for administrators and knowledge authors and editors with tools for the internationalization of knowledge…
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Avoid The 70% Failure Rate Of Change Management Initiatives | Forrester Blogs

pandalovenet:</p>
<p>Kasia | bicyclegirls.pl | dziewczyny na rowerach” /></p>
<p>Found at <a href=Avoid The 70% Failure Rate Of Change Management Initiatives | Forrester Blogs.

Read all at

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- The Obvious? – Ten ways to create a knowledge ecology by Euan Semple

Ecology and economy, I would say. It takes discipline to achieve, said my master.

Found at - The Obvious? – Ten ways to create a knowledge ecology.

A tweet yesterday prompted me to remember sage advice from Dave Snowden which I took to heart in my work with social tools at the BBC. “You can’t manage knowledge but you can create a knowledge ecology”. I thought it might be useful to others to list the ten most important things I learned about doing this

Read all at - The Obvious? – Ten ways to create a knowledge ecology.

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