KMWorld Trend-Setting Products of 2011 – KMWorld Magazine

onetrackmindcycling:</p>
<p>kinsssthetics:</p>
<p>prank me</p>
<p>next up on the otm submission list… hint hint<br />
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<p>Via <a href=Scoop.it – Designing designed customer service

KMWorld Trend-Setting Products of 2011KMWorld MagazineConsona: Consona KM 8.0- a true knowledge management solution with enhanced usability for administrators and knowledge authors and editors with tools for the internationalization of knowledge…
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So We Adapt. What’s the Downside? — HBS Working Knowledge

Found at So We Adapt. What’s the Downside? — HBS Working Knowledge.

Adaptability is a current byword in a world filled with uncertainty at all levels, including that of the individual. We adapt by listening to and heeding customers. We adapt by delegating authority, often to teams operating at the lowest levels of the organization

Read all at So We Adapt. What’s the Downside? — HBS Working Knowledge.

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Social breathes new life into Knowledge Management for Customer Service | Forrester Blogs

velover:  hm7:  donblog:  (via birdsbiking, naybowl)

Looking back I do not see that much progress in how Customer Service approaches Knowledge Management in the last decade. My working thesis is that there will rise an urgent need for distributing over all the emergent channels.

Found at Social breathes new life into Knowledge Management for Customer Service | Forrester Blogs.

You have to admit that knowledge management (KM) is hard – it’s hard to explain, hard to implement, hard to do right. It’s not just technology. It is a combination of organizational realignment, process change and technology combined in the right recipe that is needed to make KM successful. And when it is successful, it delivers real results – reduced handle times, increased agent productivity and first closure rates, better agent consistency, increased customer satisfaction. Check out the case studies on any of the KM vendor’s sites to see real statistics.

Read more at Social breathes new life into Knowledge Management for Customer Service | Forrester Blogs.

Photocredit: velover:

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Are You Wasting Money On Useless Knowledge Management? – Ian MacMillan, Max Boisot, and Martin Ihrig – The Conversation – Harvard Business Review

Working in a customer contact center, this is not a hard one. Focusing on first line completion and first time fix are relevant KPI’s. It becomes difficult as soon as we change the context in a multi-channel customer journey with internal and social external touchpoints.

Found at Are You Wasting Money On Useless Knowledge Management? – Ian MacMillan, Max Boisot, and Martin Ihrig – The Conversation – Harvard Business Review.

Is your company investing in expensive knowledge management systems that are useless for making big, strategy decisions? Most companies recognize the need for knowledge management, but often delegate it to the IT and HR departments without linking it to corporate strategy, often thereby wasting both resources and the strategic options their firm’s knowledge could generate.

To be continued at Are You Wasting Money On Useless Knowledge Management? – Ian MacMillan, Max Boisot, and Martin Ihrig – The Conversation – Harvard Business Review

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Again recommended: The Three Eras of Knowledge Management – Summary

Knowledge Management was recognised as a serio...
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Found at  conversation matters: The Three Eras of Knowledge Management – Summary.

The Three Eras of Knowledge Management – Summary

I have posted lengthy descriptions of each of the three eras of knowledge management and here I have made a brief summary of all three. I have also made substantial changes to the third era in this post. If you would like to view each era in more detail just click on the heading of that era in this post.

Since the term “knowledge management” came into popular usage, there have been three significant changes in how organizations have thought about their knowledge. Each successive era has expanded the type of knowledge that organizations considered important without eliminating the need for and use of the previous type of knowledge.

Knowledge management began in the mid 1990’s. Before that time knowledge was typically considered the province of training and was thought of as an individual capability. However, in the mid-90s Peter Drucker began to write about “knowledge workers” and the “knowledge economy” and proposed the idea that knowledge was a critical organizational asset that was as important as capital or property.

Screen shot 2010-08-01 at 9.13.24 AMTo be continued at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2010/08/the-three-eras-of-knowledge-management-summary.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+ConversationMatters+(conversation+matters)

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