- The Obvious? – Ten ways to create a knowledge ecology by Euan Semple

Ecology and economy, I would say. It takes discipline to achieve, said my master.

Found at - The Obvious? – Ten ways to create a knowledge ecology.

A tweet yesterday prompted me to remember sage advice from Dave Snowden which I took to heart in my work with social tools at the BBC. “You can’t manage knowledge but you can create a knowledge ecology”. I thought it might be useful to others to list the ten most important things I learned about doing this

Read all at - The Obvious? – Ten ways to create a knowledge ecology.

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So We Adapt. What’s the Downside? — HBS Working Knowledge

Found at So We Adapt. What’s the Downside? — HBS Working Knowledge.

Adaptability is a current byword in a world filled with uncertainty at all levels, including that of the individual. We adapt by listening to and heeding customers. We adapt by delegating authority, often to teams operating at the lowest levels of the organization

Read all at So We Adapt. What’s the Downside? — HBS Working Knowledge.

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Social breathes new life into Knowledge Management for Customer Service | Forrester Blogs

velover:  hm7:  donblog:  (via birdsbiking, naybowl)

Looking back I do not see that much progress in how Customer Service approaches Knowledge Management in the last decade. My working thesis is that there will rise an urgent need for distributing over all the emergent channels.

Found at Social breathes new life into Knowledge Management for Customer Service | Forrester Blogs.

You have to admit that knowledge management (KM) is hard – it’s hard to explain, hard to implement, hard to do right. It’s not just technology. It is a combination of organizational realignment, process change and technology combined in the right recipe that is needed to make KM successful. And when it is successful, it delivers real results – reduced handle times, increased agent productivity and first closure rates, better agent consistency, increased customer satisfaction. Check out the case studies on any of the KM vendor’s sites to see real statistics.

Read more at Social breathes new life into Knowledge Management for Customer Service | Forrester Blogs.

Photocredit: velover:

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Recommended: Social is a substitute for quality and customers don’t care about you

One of my favorite bloggers is Bertrand Duperrin. I do not know how to react. Anyway, I know that Bertrands favors a miniskirt approach. It should tease male readers but not reveal the subject. How this post does this for u2!

Recommended: Social is a substitute for quality and customers don’t care about you http://ht.ly/195No1

Photocredit: Mikael Colville-Andersen

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