It is the delivery system, stupid that impacts the new normal

Nowadays, your are reading more and more we read about explanations why technology is stirring up society and dusted organizations.

How sad, is it not?

by Vanilla and lace on Flickr.

It is your job that is at stake. As is your organization and any institution that must adapt.

Are you middle-class? It will be hard to thrive in this ago of disruption.

Do you belong to the happy few? Chances are that your wealth in spite of all of the crises has increased substantially in the last few years.

We all witness that technology enabled us to move away from traditional concepts to the re-invention of goods, services and experiences

It is not that old technology stuff hat has lost its relevance; it’s the underlying delivery system. Due to to the rise of technology and social in one’s personal and professional lives.

The rise of new delivery concepts

As a service designer, contemplating about  the intersection of business and technology, I realize how essential it is to understand and adapt to enabling technology. But for me, it is not about technology. It is about grasping how we are moving to a service based economy and its consequences. Not only for the business context, but also for the political and societal consequences.

One-way street

From a theoretical point of view, the use of technology might deliver more profitable corporate  environments, better aligned with the functional and emotional needs of your employees and the rationale for the company. Applying relevant targeted concepts and being able to transfer these concepts to the working environment and professional lives.

However, things have changed.

Your customer, your client, your employees do no longer accept – in spite of all the state of art technology – a one way street of coordination and communication. In almost every business context service elements dominate now the way of creating value. Value is created in an excellent symbiose between the client and the organization (and often, there fits technology).  People, citizens everywhere are demanding that they have a say in the way their experiences are created.

A new challenge: the ecosystem

Was everything just that simple. To be truly successful one has to reframe the landscape in which you operate. Reframing is more than an insight: it is about shifting your fundamental thoughts about how the world works. Getting equipped with a sound reframe, companies and institutions can discover new value creation opportunities in many markets.  Delivery is not limited to a the traditional core business. Profits can be made in other often

by Halley Alexa

loosely coupled markets.

Sounds good, is it not?

But what is possible for you, is also possible for all participants in all other ecosystems.

New economics

Economics will always be governed by the rules of supply and demand. But in the new normal needs and service based solutions will pave the way to a profitable future.

Any way, it is up to you.  You do need some beliefs to chart a path to a better future . And in the new normal, for me acting like a strategic service designer, and not merely being a technology fan, will be your ultimate weapon.

 


 

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Nissan’s Forthcoming Smart Rearview Mirror

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Don’t you hate it when the view through your rearview mirror is obscured by the rear seat headrests, or that hitchhiking drifter that you picked up? Back when I still owned a car, I pulled the rear headrests out of my ’01 Golf just so I could get a clear view. Then there’s this ridiculous design trend we have now for absurdly chunky C-pillars, which completely obscure your view of whatever’s behind your car’s rear quarters.

Nissan is addressing this with their forthcoming Smart Rearview Mirror, which they’re unveiling at the Geneva Motor Show:

It’s so simple, and so elegant, that we can’t imagine a future where the automakers that aren’t already developing their own versions can resist piling on. And I like the way the interface mimics the traditional dimming effect, where you just flick the little angle-changer behind the mirror.

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Now that they’ve got this together, the question is—why not have it be persistent?

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Digital means: it must be fast

Investing in algorithms is paramount in web design tools. That was one of my conclusions in my post Yabba-Dabba Do or here comes WebYdo.

Welcome to the real world

In the Netherlands I’m subscribed to a monthly called Telecommerce. Such a name creates impressions of the late 90’s. That’s why the publishing company decided to restyle all associated touchpoints. The rebranding of the offline version took some effort but is there; rebranding of the online version not yet because as the chief editor stated “ICT”.

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Recently I read about a public institution that is aiming to relaunch its website september 2015. Yes, indeed 18 months after today.

Bye bye old world

Not being able to deliver with a certain speed, a lack of ICT-skills  and not being able to innovate, is indeed something of the late ’90’s.
But your world has transformed.
Underlying the transformation in the business and professional world (and admit it, in your private life too) are two major forces:

Speed of change

The rate of change has exploded, creating a demand for technology driven concepts. Your customers live in  real-time world. They demand real-time solutions,  integrated as much as possible online, offline and with all relevant social networks.

Control of scarce time

Customers choose where and when to interact with brands. If possible on their mobile devices. Lacking time, they prefer touch points that are state of the art and create an impression of the near future. Companies must anticipate to meet those changing customers need.
My two real-world examples deny that the business world has changed.   One might wonder  how business addresses topics like digital business transformation , mobile or omni-channel-service in such a paradigm.

Hello new world

To give a right answer to the above-mentioned forces, I’m an advocate of agile development and continuous improvement.

  • Apply the principles of agile development across all business functions.
  • Adapt and accelerate processes to keep up with and take advantage of rapid technological change.
  • Embrace the power of networks, platforms and partnerships.
  • Adopt next-generation technology to reach your business, professional and personal goals.
As a fact of life: enterprises and organizations need to reshape themselves to become faster and, often, that goes for digital touch points, its content and services too. Some claim that to achieve success this requires a fair amount of planning, meetings and reporting.

Rachel Palmer

However, for me design thinking and service design are superior to such an approach.

The focus on human needs (emotional and functional) requires that discovery, defining and design are the fundamental steps before developing and deploying the touch points. Steps taken as fast as possible.

The growth of design thinking is a fine example for how tech-development-only approaches can become nimble.

In our old world, it was always about big projects, huge project failure rates and pushing the outdated technology concepts into the market over the course of time (too late, too little functionality).

In the new world, there are touch points that are constantly changing. Our world has become about nonstop adoption with multiplying possibilities. You can not connect to an emerging social network once in a year. If you do, you run the risk of becoming irrelevant.

What’s crucial is an entrepreneur’s mindset.

Their agile and lean mindset is necessary when it comes to be successful in today’s world. For your successful future, use the tools and services that bridge the divide between traditional approaches and the new digital reality.

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Design Thinking: A Useful Myth | Design Thinkin…

A powerful myth has arisen upon the land, a myth that permeates business, academia, and government. It is pervasive and persuasive. But although it is relatively harmless, it is false. The myth?

See on www.scoop.it

-40 by ~eZhika on deviantART

-40 by ~eZhika on deviantART

 

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Finding the Sweet Spot: User Experience Design, Service Design, etc.

Polienne | a personal style diary: MANGO SALE AT VENTE EXLUSIVE

Polienne | a personal style diary: MANGO SALE AT VENTE EXLUSIVE

Differences and definitions of User Experience Design, Service Design, Information Architecture, and Enterprise Architecture.

User Experience Design – Designs the interface of the experience.

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» The Service Design & Tourism Conference changed the way I think. Here’s how…

Nice report, thanks! MT @atlargeinc: The #SDT2013 conference changed the way @MattTyas thinks…http://t.co/1iOpvxBtdo #servicedesign

See on www.atlargeinc.com

Dakota and Elle Fanning photographed by Mario Sorrenti; styled by Lori Goldstein; W Magazine December 2011.   (via suicideblonde)

Dakota and Elle Fanning photographed by Mario Sorrenti; styled by Lori Goldstein; W Magazine December 2011. (via suicideblonde)

 

 

How not getting crushed: a book review of Mark Ingwer’s Empathetic Marketing

I’m a regular reader of marketing books.

For the sake of  my professional and personal development; and because books – in any form – are fun reading. Having spent some effort into service design,  i was looking for ways to better understand what drives empathy, a primary building stone in service design.  And how  to enhance a successful application.

Over the last decades, many great theories about how to empathize have become available. The finest example for me is David Rock’s Your brain at work which empowers managers to use neuroscience insights to improve professionally and personally. And now an equivalent is available for marketeers and service designers,

Empathetic Marketing: How to Satisfy the 6 Core Emotional Needs of Your Customers

Mark Ingwer

Palgrave Macmillan (2012)

I’ m thrilled that someone combine insights from several quite different concepts and writes a book such as this one. 

As a service designer one tries to fulfill a clients functional and emotional needs. Often explicit and sometimes implict. I consider the book as a  guide to a better understanding of the emotional needs of any customer and client. The essence according to Mark is personal growth, with a foundation into self actualization and relatedness.

There are separate chapters to each of the six “core emotional needs” (i.e. control, self-expression, growth, recognition, belonging, and care)  with  some fine examples from corporate sources or from Mark’s own practice.

Some of his top insights:

o  The frequently hidden (or at least unrecognized) human needs that drive clients and customers are often hidden or not recognized
o  What is a Needs Continuum is and why it should be coordinated with a psychological perspective
o  How best to empathize with consumers’ core needs for control, self-expression, growth, recognition, belonging, and care
o  A few core guidelines how to take an empathetic approach to marketing with a focus on personal growth, relatedness and self actualization.

I mentioned before David Rock’s book. I notice consistency in the concepts they use for either marketing (Mark Ingwer) or management (David Rock).  Using both approaches in one field might create a lot of synergy and exciting energy

About the author

Mark Ingwer, PhD, is a consumer psychologist and the managing partner of Insight Consulting Group, a global marketing and strategy consultancy specializing in market research and consumer insights. He has 25 years experience applying his blend of psychology, marketing, and industry acumen to helping companies optimize their brand and marketing strategy based on an in-depth understanding of their customers. He is the author of the book “Empathetic Marketing” published by Palgrave, May 2012.

The core

This synopsis was found on http://idreambooks.com/Empathetic-Marketing-by-Mark-Ingwer/reviews/2393

In today’s competitive and global marketplace, it is becoming increasingly essential for companies and brands to understand patrickdavidutah:Start of a perfect day… coffee and watching it snow.why customers buy—or don’t buy—their products and services. Only by understanding the “whys” can companies grow their business and develop loyal customers. In Empathetic Marketing, Dr. Mark Ingwer presents a groundbreaking approach to understanding consumers’ core emotional needs. This innovative book provides both the psychological theory underlying consumers’ emotional needs, as well as concrete business examples that demonstrate the incredible effectiveness of unleashing the power of deeper needs and emotions for success in the marketplace.

Empathetic Marketing shows how brands like NPR, Universal Studios, Nivea, and Google perform in-depth analyses of their customers’ emotional reactions and harness the power of deep psychological insights to optimize their marketing and brand strategy.

As the founding partner at Insight Consulting Group, a global marketing and strategy consultancy, Mark Ingwer has conducted and analyzed countless in-depth studies of customers, from neurological data to in-field observational studies. Through his extensive experience he has identified six basic emotional needs that every company must consider to fully impact and motivate the customer. Empathetic Marketing provides readers with a deeper understanding of customers’ core emotional needs, and a framework for incorporating these concepts into their business to optimize customer engagement and achieve a significant return on this investment. The strategies provided will not only lead to a better immediate connection between the customer and the company, but also to deeper and longer-term satisfaction for both customers and business leaders.

My rating

4,5 stars on a scale 0-5.

Lots of  cases that inspires one, presented simply.  

I really loved  in particular the discovery of the  six elements. As a professional and as person one of my 2014 resolutions is working with these  on  a daily basis and make sure it creates success on the professional and personal level!

This book is a recommended reading for anyone who is interested in understanding empathy and using the insights in the business world. It is now up to you how that knowledge and information will be applied by you  to achieve business, professional or personal success. And avoiding getting crushed in these changing timea by not using state of the art insights.

Photocredits coffee: http://coffeenotes.tumblr.com

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Mark Ingwer on How to apply the needs continuum in the marketplace

Guest author: Mark Ingwer, PhD, is a consumer psychologist and the managing partner of Insight Consulting Group, a global marketing and strategy consultancy specializing in market research and consumer insights. He has 25 years experience applying his blend of psychology, marketing, and industry acumen to helping companies optimize their brand and marketing strategy based on an in-depth understanding of their customers. He is the author of the book “Empathetic Marketing” published by Palgrave, May 2012.

In consumer business strategy –branding, advertising, public relations, or product development and design– understanding and addressing the emotional human needs continuum is not as simple as choosing a need and force-fitting it to your product and message. Businesses that seek to create superior products and experiences need to learn how to do a better job of empathizing with consumer needs.

Years ago, our firm conducted research at Universal Studios Florida and Walt Disney World, both in Orlando. At the time, Universal was searching for new ways to

distinguish itself from its giant competitor. We conducted consumer deep-dive research with 14 families with children of varying ages, selected to provide a diverse participant mix representing the typical park visitor population. We followed these families around the park observing their moods and behaviors, and discussed with them their thoughts and impressions as they experienced the parks. Essentially, we wanted to know what was really at play during a family vacation.

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We all take vacations to escape daily life or to reconnect with loved ones. To experience thrills different from everyday life. To provide children new experiences that they’ll take with them into adulthood. To leave our routines behind. Some people find it hard to detach from the world of work (smartphone addicts, raise your hands) but we tell ourselves, if only for a few days or weeks, we have to.

Vacations satisfy our need for pleasure, which is a commodity in a culture that refuses to slow down and smile every once in awhile. Just look at Americans’ attitudes toward downtime. Vacation days in America are miniscule compared to our European friends.

So what happens in these few weeks when we supposedly escape and let work pile up in our inbox? In the context of emotional needs, a destination theme park can mean a lot more to its patrons than they can readily articulate. It’s not about the fun theyexpe rience, but rather the function of the fun for the family’s growth and sustenance.

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One might think that the two parks are locked in a win-lose competition for Sunshine State vacationers and their children, but that’s not necessarily true.
 Many families, especially with children of different ages, go to both parks. At one time, however, the theme parks offered discernibly different atmospheres. One of our interview subjects put it best: “Disney is like sitting by a stream. Universal is like going rock climbing.

Both are enjoyable, both are nature, but with one, you’ve got more of that nervous adrenaline rush. Our researchers and I spent days observing how this participant’s analogy was on the money. The polarity of experiences is perhaps why some vacationers visit both parks.

Who doesn’t enjoy a little relaxation mixed in with action on their vacations? At the time, Universal and Disney mirrored the needs continuum. However, this has changed. They aren’t merely high-end amusement resorts that offer different sets of thrills for families. They’re helping families satisfy polar psychological needs for their children.

Remember, young people, from toddlers to teens, have conflicting sentiments, with a desire for the security of connectedness pulling them in one direction and a desire for the adventure of independence pulling in another. At the time of our research, the Walt Disney World experience appealed to their desires for security, safety, and closeness.

It is a child’s and a family’s rite of passage. It has always offered an undeniably fantastic experience that feeds children’s imaginations. But generally speaking, its essence nurtures a younger child’s connection in a safe and fantastic world. Disney is the quintessential “mother” archetype.

a phil-opon
We found that Universal Studios, on the other hand, appealed to older children and their families’ desire to explore, to be curious, and to interact with the world around them, through which they gain a sense of mastery and accomplishment. By developing and solidifying this sense of autonomy, children develop self-esteem and understanding of personal agency. Universal Studios was perceived as edgier and more adventurous—generally more stimulating and intellectually challenging. No longer was Universal just the more exciting cousin of Disney. Instead, it was an amusementpark that satisfied its visitors’ needs for individuality and independence in ways Disney wasn’t designed to do.
Recognizing this fundamental difference between itself and Disney, Universal changedits marketing efforts from promoting what it wanted consumers to experience to a testimonial to what the experience was already providing. No longer focusing on their longstanding marketing platform – “ride the movies”– they built a new strategy –“Experience an extraordinary escape at Universal. Slowly and steadily, Universal made gains in gate entries. Of course, this dynamic has changed in recent years. The Disney of decades past is not the Disney we find today. Their parks are now much more “Universal” in their feel, entertainment offerings, rides, and attractions. That said, the dynamic illustrates the profound opportunities that arise when a needs-based approach is applied to existing business models.The process, however, is not simply one of a business matching its product to a customer’s psychological needs. A single product category can potentially satisfy different emotional needs for different people. To harness the value of human needs, one must understand where people are located in their life cycle. Some emotional needs are more relevant at different ages and milestones, and for different genders and personality types.

Take cell phones. Beyond placing calls, sending texts, and checking emails, what is the emotional value of the twenty-first century’s most pervasive device? A cell phone can simultaneously satisfy a person’s need for control, security, connection,growth, and expression. To be sure, the device can’t do all things for all people, and cell-phone providers would be mistaken to try to persuade people otherwise. A company’s promoting access to 100,000 apps will appeal to the individual addicted to customization and control, while alienating an older audience intimidated by the concept of a smartphone.

For many segments of the population (nontexters and Tweeters), a phone is still primarily used to talk to people! Parents like the peace of mind that comes from always being connected to their children, but the child may just be after the status or unlimited contact with his or her tightest social circles. These issues raise important questions and challenges for marketers, who must decide where and to whom to direct their resources, what needs are most relevant for a specific segment and audience, and importantly, what communication tone and style work best to appeal to and satisfy a need.

It’s important to note that we see the push and pull between connectedness and individuality at each point on the continuum. In other words, not one of the needs is owned entirely by the individuality or the connectedness side of the continuum.

For instance, consider the need for belonging, essentially connectedness within acommunity. So much of our daily routine consists of participating in groups. We join groups for closeness, and sometimes, just to “fit in.” To a great extent, though, the need for belonging is not wholly consumed by the connectedness space. What we belong to is a stamp on our individual identity.

Consider how we routinely categorize informal acquaintances. It’s not Dave, the guy with a unique perspective on financial markets, but rather it’s Dave, the guy from Rutgers, the big Mets fan, the one who volunteers with Habitat for Humanity. Certainly,we are not the church, synagogue, or mosque to which we belong. We are not the political party we vote for (and on behalf of which we argue with friends and family). We are not the company we work for. Or the brand of shoes we wear and the grocery store we frequent. But each group we ”belong” to is a distinct piece of our identity.

The Needs Continuum can only be put into action when matched with a psychological perspective that helps businesses identify their consumers’ unmet needs. With the right focus, meeting unmet emotional needs can be much more than a token statement issued in press releases.

This is a modified excerpt from “Empathetic Marketing, How to Satisfy the 6 Core Emotional Needs of Your Customers.” 

Photocredits:  thevaultofbeauty, cookahashi.co, a phil-opon

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