Forrester: Three Use Cases Illustrate the Power of Predictive Analytics In B2B #Marketing #bigdata

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There are a number of predictive analytics firms dedicated to helping B2B revenue leaders examine their own successes and losses to inform everything from account selection to next-step action analysis and recommendation.

Last year, Laura Ramos introduced them to us in her report, New Technologies Emerge To Help Unearth Buyer Insight From Mountains Of B2B Data. Laura concluded this report with a recommendation to prepare to take the predictive analytics plunge.

Well, many of you have “taken the plunge,” or are about to. Nearly two thirds of marketing decision makers plan to implement or upgrade predictive analytics solutions during the next 12 months. Since I joined Forrester a few months ago, I’ve spoken to many of you that wonder what lessons early adopters have learned and how to consider predictive marketing analytics in the context of your specific go-to-market strategies and organizational goals.

In my first Forrester report, What’s Really Possible With Predictive Marketing Right Now, Laura and I collaborated to look more closely at the trends driving predictive marketing and the common attributes among early successes.

What we found is that three categories of use cases dominate the current landscape, not only laying the foundation for more complex use of predictive marketing analytics, but also supporting the full scope of the customer lifecycle, from net-new prospect identification to account expansion:

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via Forrester Blogs Allison Snow

2-17: Continuously improve your #technology organisation #digital

I think of the Savings vs.. Investing argument when I think of why Continuous Improvement is a necessity and not a “nice-to-have..” If you sock away $500 in a savings account, there is zero risk of loss, but, in reality, inflation is causing you to lose money..

Source: Continuously improve your technology organisation

More than digital plus traditional: A truly omnichannel customer experience | McKinsey & Company

In sector after sector, companies are asking how they can adapt to the digital world—how they can build more digital capabilities, create more digital offerings, and even become “digital first” organizations.But for institutions that have served customers for decades in person and over the phone, digital too often falls short. After the debut of a new app, for example, a jump in sales may not be as big as expected, while hoped-for operational efficiencies—such as a reduction in expensive call-center and in-store customer-support requests—hardly materialize.Executives naturally wonder why: aren’t customers demanding digital? Without question, they are. But not to the exclusion of other channels, which remain critically important.For example, as much attention (and fear) as Amazon may generate among traditional retailers, as of early 2016 about 92 percent of retail sales in the United States—the company’s home and largest market—were still taking place in person. Furthermore, our analysis of market research confirms that many customers (including large majorities in some markets and industries) want to move freely from channel to channel in an omnichannel experience. Accordingly, the digital end-to-end offerings and internal capabilities that companies are building are important not only in themselves but also in the way they support the other channels (see Driek Desmet, Ewan Duncan, Jay Scanlan, and Marc Singer, “Six building blocks for creating a high-performing digital enterprise,” September 2015).Retailers have increasi

Source: More than digital plus traditional: A truly omnichannel customer experience | McKinsey & Company