Too many companies squander the treasure that is customer feedback. The solution is systematically measuring the customer’s voice and integrating it into a culture of continuous feedback.

Customer-experience metrics have proliferated over the past decade, and chances are that your business relies heavily on one or more of them.

But many companies struggle with metrics.

For some, the problem is a disconnect between the metric and business performance; for others, it’s a loss of confidence among frontline workers when the metrics don’t seem to explain big swings in customer satisfaction. Further, in some companies, there is confusion about whether transactional or relational measures matter more, and, in others, a simple lack of results from too much focus on one top-line metric.

Complicating the problem, many companies struggle with collecting, analyzing, and acting on feedback. Many B2B companies, for extinstance, gather customer feedback only through sales channels, missing important insights from users and influencers.

Finally, many companies don’t have the culture to loop customer feedback through the front line to improve behavior or connect it to innovation.

Taken together, these complications leave many companies tone-deaf to the voice of the customer and represent a formidable barrier to building the foundation of a successful customer-centric strategy.

Happily, our experience shows that it matters less which top-line metric a business relies on; almost any one will do.

Rather, what matters is how the business inserts the metric into a systematic capability to collect, analyze, and act on feedback in an effective and complete measurement system of the customer journey.

Building that system can take time, but gains to a customer-centric culture and the bottom line can accrue quickly.

Source: Are you really listening to what your customers are saying? | McKinsey & Company

 

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